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Winter Cycling in Dhaka: Things to Watch Out For


Hatirjheel on a Wintery Morning in 2012
Winter is the perfect time to take up cycling in Dhaka. The temperatures don't drop too much and there is always a cool breeze. As a result, sweating goes down and you can pedal a lot more whether you are a casual rider or a serious one.
Still there are a few things to watch out for.
  • Early morning temperatures will drop more than 10 degrees from the average temperature of the day. With wind, it can feel like less than 10 degrees. To avoid feeling like a cold popsicle, wear a base layer of clothing under your cycling jersey. Since the weather is not very extreme, a simple synthetic T-shirt will suffice. Synthetic is the keyword as it must not absorb and retain sweat but rather should let it vaporize.
  • Take a camera along, the ray of the sun through morning mists create absolutely astonishing photo moments. A photographer can turn these moments to works of art. Even a non-photographer like me can turn out some decent ones with a mobile phone

Morning Mist, somewhere in Bossila
  • Drink lots of water. Winters are seriously deceiving. You won't feel thirsty for a very long time. But when finally it hits you, you are already dehydrated and will start losing strength rapidly. So keep drinking lot's of water. I would recommend at least 1 liter every hour. Once the sun comes up, the temperatures rise fast but the chill wind still makes you feel cool. Don't be deceived. You are still losing water from your body
  • Early mornings are still the best times to ride. Just because winter is here, traffic is not going to get any better.
Race Training in Hatirjheel with Team BDC

  • Hit the trails. Go offroading, find some jungles, take the earthy roads all around Dhaka. Find a river and spend some time drinking tea beside it. Or simply get lost out there. Nothing can beat that feeling of winter trail rides.
Misty Mornings in Rupganj Trails
Cycling in Dhaka just doesn't get any better than this. So don't miss out on the fun this winter. Go for it.

Comments

Anindya said…
Nice article with lots of information. Keep writing for us! :)

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